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Access to Collections

The University of Michigan Museum of Paleontology is a research museum.  Access to collections for external researchers is by appointment only.

COLLECTIONS:

The Museum of Paleontology collections have been relocated to our state-of-the-art facility at the Research Museums Center.  We thank you for your patience during the move process and hope that you will visit us at our new facility.

  • Vertebrate Collections - available for research visits, loans, loan returns, and other requests.  As reorganization and unpacking is ongoing, there may be delays or limitations associated with access to some specimens.

                Contact: Dr. Adam Rountrey arountre@umich.edu

  • Invertebrate Collections - available for research visits, loans, loan returns, and other requests.  As reorganization and unpacking is ongoing, there may be delays or limitations associated with access to some specimens.

                Contact: Dr. Jennifer Bauer bauerjen@umich.edu

  • Paleobotany Collections- available for research visits, loans, loan returns, and other requests.  We are currently transitioning to a new database system, which may temporarily disrupt some activities.

                  Contact: Dr. Adam Rountrey arountre@umich.edu

LOAN RETURNS: 

Please notify the relevant collection manager when shipping loan returns to the Museum of Paleontology and note that our Geddes Ave. address is no longer valid.  

Ship specimens by trackable means (e.g., UPS or FedEx) to:

University of Michigan Museum of Paleontology
Suite 1820 Research Museums Center
3600 Varsity Drive
Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48108
USA

Paleontology at Michigan is organized in four subdisciplines:

These are "curatorial sections" in the Museum of Paleontology and reflect how collections are organized. Resources devoted to subdisciplines and museum sections reflect, to some extent, the history of interest and activity in each.

Requests to study specimens should be made in writing (by letter or email) and addressed to the appropriate curator. It is important that requests to study specimens be made well in advance of any anticipated visit because curators are sometimes in the field, and access to some collections involves logistical complications. It is also important that requests be sufficiently detailed that notice can be given if specimens of interest are on loan elsewhere or currently under study here.

Copies of requests to study Invertebrate and Vertebrate specimens may be sent to the Invertebrate Collection Manager or to the Vertebrate Collection Manager, as appropriate.